Allele

The word "allele" is a short form of allelomorph ("other form", a word coined by British geneticists William Bateson and Edith Rebecca Saunders), which was used in the early days of genetics to describe variant forms of a gene detected as different phenotypes. It derives from the Greek prefix ἀλληλο-, allelo-, meaning "mutual", "reciprocal", or "each other", which itself is related to the Greek adjective ἄλλος, allos (cognate with Latin alius), meaning "other".

10 posts

Sounds Like a Savings Account

by Martin Luther and others in Figures of Speech

I am trying to be clever here but I don't think it's working. There is some wisdom in the concept of a forced savings account, fundamentally this is what Conservativism should be about. You know, saving for a rainy day.

Poo On Your Shoe!

by Frederick the Great and others in Figures of Speech

Inaction and indifference are two sides of the same coin, flipping this binomial distributor will reveal telling tales of duty-bound social narratives that clean up the mess of your inaction and indifference.

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