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For What Reason?

Cheekiness aside, the reason for reason is self-evident and fractal in nature. Where thoughts converge, reason is present. Gifts of repeatability and the awareness to know better (from worse). If no one is around to tell the story, reason fall silent. So let your words burn, not your planet.

3 months ago

Latest Post And killed the cat by Thomas Hobbes public

For What Reason?

Reason is immortal, all else mortal.

- Pythagoras (570-495 BC)

As Peter Shaffer put it to Arnold Wesker - THE planksip Möbius

As Peter Shaffer put it to Arnold Wesker - THE planksip Möbius

For What Reason?

Inspired by Pythagoras (570-495 BC)'s quote, "Reason is immortal, all else mortal." The titled responsion is...

Cheekiness aside, the reason for reason is self-evident and fractal in nature. Where thoughts converge, reason is present. Gifts of repeatability and the awareness to know better (from worse). If no one is around to tell the story, reason fall silent. So let your words burn, not your planet.

he Philosopher of Elea, Pythagoras, lived between 5th Century BC and 4th Century BC. Pythagoras is famous for his contribution to geometry and mathematics as well as his theories concerning the nature of the universe. Pythagoras believed that there are forces at work in the world that govern everything from weather to human affairs. His major teachings were based on an understanding of these forces, which he called "the modes of things." In other words, they were what made the world what it is, and that is why he formulated what would become the basic principles of mathematics, science, and philosophy.

Pythagoras was an Ionian Greek philosopher who lived during the fourth and third centuries BC. His religious and political teachings were very popular among the Greeks and were influenced by the teachings of Socrates and Plato. Pythagoras believed that all things were part of a larger whole, which made them equal and that God is always the creator of all things. Pythagoras's teachings also included that there is a balance in everything and that there is always a meaning in things. He held that good and evil are never absolute, but rather are relative. He also believed that we are part of something greater than ourselves, which he called "nature." According to Pythagoras, everything is connected to the earth, and everything in the world is governed by the cycles of nature.

Although many scholars believe that Pythagoras's contributions to mathematics are too great to be accurately dated, some of his works have survived intact, and their importance is appreciated today. Some of his most important works include the Book of Timaeus and Laws of Attraction. His writings can be found in the library of Alexandria in Egypt, although much of what is available comes from a modern perspective. It was not until the twentieth century that modern scholars were able to completely understand the contents of the books. In fact, most of what is known is based on speculation. Some modern scholars do not believe that Pythagoras's contributions to mathematics were as profound as those attributed to him by early modern Greek and Roman writers. The only reason why there has been so much controversy over Pythagoras's mathematical contributions is because it was so difficult for early men of his time to understand them.

As Peter Shaffer put it to Arnold Wesker

Inspired by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832)'s quote, "We are shaped and fashioned by what we love". The titled responsion is

THE planksip Möbius: I would like to begin and end with a thought I first read in George Steiner's Grammars of Creation...

Peter Shaffer put it to Arnold Wesker:
furious, inchoate energy funnelled through shape (and only so) reconstitutes itself as furious energy in the brains and psyches of its recipients. Reconstitutes itself because of you. The fire which started in the playwright’s head must get dimmer and dimmer as it grows in the communal imagination of an audience. Your job is to convey sacred flame in a vessel. You can say, looking at that vessel smoking on the stage: “How miserable. I have seen the Volcano, and all I caught is one wretched tongue of fire.” But that tongue properly placed and focused upon is the Volcano. Your power to concentrate fire for an audience will make them feel it, and be burned by it, even though they don’t know the volcano, and never can…. what one writes can detonate in a viewer’s head with the same resonance that it had when one first put it down on paper …

As Peter Shaffer put it to Arnold Wesker - THE planksip Möbius

Published 3 months ago