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Through the Looking Glass by Lewis Carroll (REVIEW)

And here we are, back with another banger from Lewis Carroll - featuring, yet again, the lovely Alice. This time, though, we are not going to fall down the rabbit hole and travel to a psychedelic dreamland of highly illustrious characters and cosmically inspired dialogue.

a year ago

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A Critic's Meta Review: 4/5

Through the Looking Glass by Lewis Carroll (1832-1898). Published by planksip

And here we are, back with another banger from Lewis Carroll - featuring, yet again, the lovely Alice. This time, though, we are not going to fall down the rabbit hole and travel to a psychedelic dreamland of highly illustrious characters and cosmically inspired dialogue. No; what we are going to do this time is crawl through the mirror and travel to a psychedelic dreamland of highly illustrious characters and cosmically inspired dialogue. Not all of the same characters, though.

We’ve got the walrus now.

It’s like Lennon said:

“During the lifetime of great revolutionaries, the oppressing classes constantly hounded them, received their theories with the most savage malice, the most furious hatred and the most unscrupulous campaigns of lies and slander. After their death, attempts are made to convert them into harmless icons, to canonize them, so to say, and to hallow their names to a certain extent for the “consolation” of the oppressed classes and with the object of duping the latter, while at the same time robbing the revolutionary theory of its substance, blunting its revolutionary edge and vulgarizing it.”

Huh?

Anyways, like I was saying, it’s like Lennon said:

“There are decades where nothing happens; there are weeks where decades happen.”

What in the world are you - oh, Lord.

My sweet Lord.

JOHN LENNON!!!!!

JOHN WINSTON ONO LENNON!!!

...I am the walrus?

There we go, Donnie!

Fun fact: in subsequent interviews, following the release of the Magical Mystery Tour album, John has expressed his regret in choosing the walrus as the subject of that song. After taking another look at the poem, perhaps with a new set of spectacles (in more than just the literal sense), he came to the conclusion that the walrus was, in fact, the villain of the poem while the carpenter was the hero. The walrus, Lennon realized, was nothing but a cruel, cold-hearted capitalist while the carpenter was an honest-to-God working man. A working class hero, if you will. Something to be.

Something...in the way she moves.

Sorry.

I can’t help it; George was always my favorite. But that’s probably because I’m a dirty, tree trunk hugging, drum circle loving, freak flag flying, streetside burrito buying, eastern mysticism believing, true dream achieving hippie kid with a penchant for spreading love and kindness to any and every living being that crosses my path. Or maybe it’s just because I play guitar, and George was easily the best guitarist in the band.

Paul could hold his own, too, though. Funny thing about that Paul, by the way - he was the walrus, all along. Don’t believe me? Here - look through this glass (onion).

Through the Looking Glass by Lewis Carroll (1832-1898). Published by planksip

Published a year ago