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Over-Achievement Will Blow Your Mind!

One way to interpret the space between negation is an ordered aesthetics, a beauty of sorts separated by an ocean of chaos. Keeping your head above water is suffocating at times. To "over" achieve is underrated, or so I hear and an extreme waste of energy.

4 months ago

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Over-Achievement Will Blow Your Mind!

If you plan on being anything less than you are capable of being, you will probably be unhappy all the days of your life.

- Abraham Maslow (1908-1970)

Black Lines Separated by White Spaces - A planksip Inversion of Thought

Black Lines Separated by White Spaces - A planksip Inversion of Thought

Over-Achievement Will Blow Your Mind!

when I read that sentence I thought that maybe this person was just saying that as you get older, you will have to deal with all the problems that you can't take care of right now. But then the person said that, you will have to deal with some of the problems that you're dealing with now if you want to be anything less than you are capable of being. He said that you will only have to deal with those things that you can do about now, not when you get older. He also said that you need to be able to accept your limitations and you also need to know how to get through these days.

Well, I don't know if anyone has ever told me that when you get older that you're going to be happy and content, but I think that it might be time for some real advice. You see, I've been there before and I know exactly what it feels like to get older and I also know exactly what it's going to feel like to be a happy and contented adult. I'm not sure what it is that you are dealing with right now. Are you just getting older and not happy or do you have some other health condition that's causing your unhappiness? You need to figure out what's wrong with you, and then you need to get your health and your life back on track. There's nothing wrong with taking a look at some self-help books and then making some changes in your life, and then start living in the moment.

The thing that I would like to point out here is that we all need to learn how to get through the tough times that we face in our lives. Sometimes the tough times are so hard that we can't seem to handle them and it makes us unhappy. Now, if we think that we're happy, we're probably lying to ourselves. If you really want to have a positive outlook on life, and you want to actually be happy, then you need to find ways to make yourself happy and stop lying to yourself. Find out what you're unhappy about in your life, and make a plan to change it and start living.

Rebel with a Clause - Calibrated So

Inspired by Albert Camus (1913-1960)'s quote, "I rebel; therefore I exist". The titled responsion is

No cause for concern, the missing clause is silence interrupted. The speech act is an enactment, a composition of sorts, performed for the benefit of one's self and the others.

The Myth of Sisyphus by Albert Camus is a book-length piece on both the philosophical and political development of revolutionary and nationalistic societies, particularly Western Europe. Camus is famous for his work against Fascism during World War II, and while his work in this area has been largely ignored for the past sixty years or so, there are some very interesting things that can be gleaned from this book about the social and political development of revolutionary societies throughout history. The first thing that stands out to me when I read The Myth of Sisyphus was the use of images to illustrate ideas. In the book, a young boy is described as having a full head of hair, but as soon as his father cut it off, the boy's hair fell out. This is an image that resonates with many people in North Africa and parts of Africa where families traditionally wear their hair short, and as a result, their heads look disheveled.

Camus uses similar imagery in this book to present a view of the modern world. For example, he illustrates the story of a young girl who falls into a pit filled with molten metal, while her brother watches helplessly. She emerges a week later with broken bones and bruises, but her mother tells her mother that she only suffered burns. While her mother insists that she must eat the meal that is to precede the revolution, she refuses to eat, believing that a revolution would just make her fat. The story of The Myth of Sisyphus illustrates that the same ideas that people reject because they do not feel like eating them are also rejected by those who believe that it would make them fat.

One other example of how ideas are portrayed through images in The Myth of Sisyphus is the depiction of the philosopher's wheel. There is an icon of a wheel in Western philosophy that illustrates the idea of an infinite progression of causes and effects. For example, the wheel can be likened to the idea of linear time, because the wheel is used to describe time and progression, even if it is not necessary for humans to move forwards or backwards through time. In this sense, the wheel is not actually representing an actual cycle of events in the world, but rather a metaphor for something that cannot be understood.


Black Lines Separated by White Spaces - A planksip Inversion of Thought

Published 4 months ago