Wellsprings and hierarchies dominate human nature, the bifurcation and reification without the Marxism is the concrete intentionality that orients us towards our goals. Teleological perhaps but necessarily sufficient as the final cause embodies (ie. each and everyone of us).

2 months ago

Latest Post The Cost of (Dis)Comfort by Daniel Sanderson public

Well Done!

I have frequently been questioned, especially by women, of how I could reconcile family life with a scientific career. Well, it has not been easy.

- Marie Curie (1867-1934)

Defy your Inner Lobster and the Outer Hierarchy of Ordered Chaos - A planksip Möbius

Defy your Inner Lobster and the Outer Hierarchy of Ordered Chaos - A planksip Möbius

Well Done!

Inspired by Marie Curie (1867-1934)'s quote, "I have frequently been questioned, especially by women, of how I could reconcile family life with a scientific career. Well, it has not been easy.". The titled responsion is

Wellsprings and hierarchies dominate human nature, the bifurcation and reification without the Marxism is the concrete intentionality that orients us towards our goals. Teleological perhaps but necessarily sufficient as the final cause embodies (ie. each and everyone of us).  

Reconciling family life with a scientific career can be a daunting task, especially for those who are in the "I don't know anything about science" camp. The good news is that there are some great resources available to help you get through the challenges. One resource that can prove quite helpful is a book by a well-known author, David Brinkley. In his book, He's Just Not Ready, Brinkley lays out the reasons why he and so many of his colleagues feel that they aren't ready to be a part of the scientific community.

Brinkley does an excellent job of explaining his thinking and how it pertains to you. The book goes over what it's like to be a scientist and then goes on to discuss what you have to do in order to get through college and become a scientist. There are many challenges involved in this career. For example, one of the most challenging things about a Ph.D. is the fact that the work doesn't end when the student graduates. They must continue to pursue their research and education, even after they have received their doctorate.

Many people who enter into a scientific career are quite aware that their job will require them to spend their lives immersed in the study of a specific problem. However, most people aren't really prepared for the rigor of the science that is involved in this kind of work. Most people are simply unaware of the emotional toll that a scientific career takes on a person's family life.

The best way to overcome these obstacles is to understand that your family life has a critical role to play in your professional success. This is why many professional people find that having children is important to their success. If you want to have a fulfilling and successful career, you have to make sure that you are also happy and comfortable with your family.

When a person decides that they want to pursue a new career, often their first question is, "Do I have children?" The answer may surprise you - there is nothing wrong with your kids. Many people make the mistake of assuming that their family will be fine with a new job, but that is simply not true.

The most difficult thing to reconcile with a scientific career is the fact that children are often the ones who suffer the most when the family is forced to deal with the new responsibilities and lifestyle changes. When a person is forced into a new career, the children are often left behind and have to learn how to adapt to the new environment. If the family is forced into an entirely new lifestyle, problems will inevitably arise that were never present before. Children need to make the effort to adjust to new habits.

It is important to make sure that you remain as involved in your child's life as possible, if not more involved. Children need and benefit from the opportunity to know the family dynamics and how the person they are supporting are handling their career. This helps them develop a sense of responsibility and maturity. The child needs to understand that the decisions that affect their family are made collectively, rather than alone.

Once you realize that your family life is critical to your career success, the challenges will less daunting. You will be more motivated to work harder, push harder, and get the results you desire. The most important thing is to know that you have help available to you if you ever need it.


Marie Curie

Published 2 months ago