planksip Giants

Consumption doesn't have to wreak havoc on planet. Most of these figures left legacies of thought worthy of examination, others should be avoided at all costs. Can you spot the dictator? New authors are climbing the ranks. #Shoulderstanding #Chartres

Latest Post Pinker vs. Damasio by Daniel Sanderson public

Victoria, British Columbia

As a science and philosophy writer, Daniel is an active blogger, author and father of two living on Vancouver Island. Oh, and he's the founder of planksip.

Washington, DC

Fluent in several languages, Samir is an ongoing and valued contributor for planksip. His authorship includes Hell in a Half Way House, several literary reviews and philosophical pensées.

Oxford, UK

Max is the founder and director of Our World in Data. He began the project in 2011 and for several years was the sole author, until receiving funding for the formation of a team.

Boulder, Colorado, USA

I'm an independent philosopher, a resolute generalist, & a radical Kantian.

Twentynine Palms, California, United States

I teach interdisciplinary workshops in performance, writing, and visual art. Included on planksip is a series called, "Economics of Suffering".

Auvers-sur-Oise, France

Vincent van Gogh was a Dutch Post-Impressionist painter who is among the most famous and influential figures in the history of Western art. In just over a decade he created about 2,100 artworks.

Died: Athens, Greece

Plato was a philosopher in Classical Greece and the founder of the Academy in Athens. He is widely considered the pivotal figure in the development of Western philosophy.

Died: August 25, 1900, Weimar, Germany

Nietzsche was a German philosopher, cultural critic, poet, philologist, and Latin and Greek scholar whose work has exerted a profound influence on Western philosophy and modern intellectual history.

Died: December 22, 1989, Paris, France

Samuel Barclay Beckett was an Irish avant-garde novelist, playwright, theatre director, and poet, who lived in Paris for most of his adult life and wrote in both English and French.

Died: February 19, 2016, Milan, Italy

Umberto Eco OMRI was an Italian novelist, literary critic, philosopher, semiotician, and university professor.

Died: October 25, 1400, London, United Kingdom

Geoffrey Chaucer, known as the Father of English literature, is widely considered the greatest English poet of the Middle Ages. He was the first poet to be buried in Poets' Corner of Westminster Abbey

Died: July 17, 1790, Panmure House

Adam Smith was a Scottish economist, philosopher and author as well as a moral philosopher, a pioneer of political economy and a key figure during the Scottish Enlightenment.

Died: July 23, 2001, Jackson, Mississippi, United States

Eudora Alice Welty was an American short story writer and novelist who wrote about the American South. Her novel The Optimist's Daughter won the Pulitzer Prize in 1973.

Died: January 13, 1941, Zürich, Switzerland

James Joyce was an Irish novelist, short story writer, and poet. He contributed to the modernist avant-garde and is regarded as one of the most influential and important authors of the 20th century.

Died: July 18, 1817, Winchester, United Kingdom

Jane Austen was an English novelist known primarily for her six major novels, which interpret, critique and comment upon the British landed gentry at the end of the 18th century.

Dublin, Republic of Ireland

Jonathan Swift was an Anglo-Irish satirist, essayist, political pamphleteer, poet and cleric who became Dean of St Patrick's Cathedral, Dublin.

Died: June 3, 1924, Kierling, Klosterneuburg, Austria

Franz Kafka was a German-language novelist and short story writer, widely regarded as one of the major figures of 20th-century literature.

Died: July 31, 1784, Paris, France

Denis Diderot was a French philosopher, art critic, and writer. He was a prominent figure during the Enlightenment and is best known for serving as co-founder, chief editor, and contributor to the...

Died: May 11, 2001, Montecito, California, United States

Douglas Noel Adams was an English author, scriptwriter, essayist, humorist, satirist and dramatist. Adams is best known as the author of The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy.

Died: March 24, 1603, Richmond Palace, Richmond, United Kingdom

Elizabeth I was Queen of England and Ireland from 17 November 1558 until her death. Sometimes called The Virgin Queen, Gloriana or Good Queen Bess, Elizabeth was the last monarch of the House of Tudor

Died: April 17, 2014, Mexico City, Mexico

Gabriel José de la Concordia García Márquez was a Colombian novelist, short-story writer, screenwriter and journalist, known affectionately as Gabo or Gabito throughout Latin America.

Rome, Italy

Michelangelo Italian sculptor, painter, architect, and poet of the High Renaissance born in the Republic of Florence, who exerted an unparalleled influence on the development of Western art.

Died: May 8, 1936, Munich, Germany

Oswald Arnold Gottfried Spengler was a German historian and philosopher of history whose interests included mathematics, science, and art.

Died: November 14, 1716, Hanover, Germany

Leibniz was a German polymath and philosopher who occupies a prominent place in the history of mathematics and the history of philosophy, having developed calculus independently of Isaac Newton.

Died: December 4, 1679, Derbyshire, United Kingdom

Thomas Hobbes, in some older texts Thomas Hobbes of Malmesbury, was an English philosopher who is considered one of the founders of modern political philosophy.

Died: December 4, 1131, Nishapur, Iran

Omar Khayyam was born in Nishapur, in northeastern Iran, and spent most of his life near the court of the Karakhanid and Seljuq rulers in the period which witnessed the First Crusade.

Died: June 21, 1527, Florence, Italy

Niccolò Machiavelli was a diplomat, politician, historian, philosopher, humanist, writer, playwright and poet of the Renaissance period and often been called the father of modern political science.

Died: February 23, 1821, Rome, Italy

John Keats was one of the main figures of the second generation of Romantic poets, along with Lord Byron and Percy Bysshe Shelley before his death from tuberculosis at the age of 25.

Died: February 11, 1963, Primrose Hill, London, United Kingdom

Sylvia Plath was a poet, novelist, and short-story writer. She studied at Smith College and Newnham College at the University of Cambridge before receiving acclaim as a poet and writer.

Died: November 7, 2016, Los Angeles, California, United States

Leonard Cohen singer-songwriter, poet and novelist. His work explored religion, politics, isolation, sexuality and personal relationships.

Paulo Coelho de Souza is a Brazilian lyricist and novelist. He is best known for his novel The Alchemist. In 2014, he uploaded his personal papers online to create a virtual Paulo Coelho Foundation.

Died: 1832, Fontainebleau, France

Charles Caleb Colton was an English cleric, writer and collector, well known for his eccentricities. Colton was educated at Eton and King's College, graduating with a B.A. in 1801 and an M.A. in 1804.

Died: January 4, 1965, Kensington

Thomas Stearns Eliot was a poet, essayist, publisher, playwright, and literary and social critic.

Died: June 1, 1952, New York City, New York, United States

John Dewey was an American philosopher, psychologist, and educational reformer whose ideas have been influential in education and social reform.

Born: June 30, 1930, Gastonia, North Carolina, United States

Thomas Sowell is an American economist, social theorist, and senior fellow at Stanford University's Hoover Institution. Born in North Carolina, Sowell grew up in Harlem, New York.

Died: October 28, 1704, High Laver, United Kingdom

John Locke FRS was an English philosopher and physician, widely regarded as one of the most influential of Enlightenment thinkers and commonly known as the "Father of Liberalism".

Died: July 31, 2012, Hollywood Hills, Los Angeles, California, United States

Eugene Louis "Gore" Vidal was an American writer and public intellectual known for his patrician manner, epigrammatic wit, and polished style of writing.

Died: June 8, 1809, Greenwich Village, New York City, New York, United States

Thomas Paine was an English-born American political activist, philosopher, political theorist, and revolutionary.

Died: August 25, 1776, Edinburgh, United Kingdom

David Hume was a Scottish philosopher, historian, economist, and essayist, who is best known today for his highly influential system of philosophical empiricism, skepticism, and naturalism.

Died: February 21, 1677, The Hague, Netherlands

Baruch Spinoza was a Dutch philosopher of Sephardi/Portuguese origin. By laying the groundwork for the 18th-century Enlightenment and modern biblical criticism, including conceptions of the self...

Died: November 2, 1950, Ayot St Lawrence, United Kingdom

Bernard Shaw, was an Irish playwright, critic and polemicist whose influence on Western theatre, culture and politics extended from the 1880s to his death and beyond.

Died: June 18, 2010, Tías, Spain

José de Sousa Saramago, GColSE, was a Portuguese writer and recipient of the 1998 Nobel Prize in Literature.

Died: January 4, 1941, Paris, France

Henri-Louis Bergson was a French philosopher, influential especially in the first half of the 20th century and after WWII in continental philosophy.

Assassinated: December 7, 43 BC, Formia, Italy

Marcus Tullius Cicero was a Roman politician who served as consul in 63 BC. From a wealthy municipal family of the Roman equestrian order, considered one of Rome's greatest orators and prose stylists.

Died: July 8, 1822, Lerici, Italy

Percy Bysshe Shelley was one of the major English Romantic poets, and is regarded by some as among the finest lyric poets in the English language, and one of the most influential.

Died: June 10, 2003, Rome, Italy

Bernard Williams, FBA was an English moral philosopher. His publications include Problems of the Self, Ethics and the Limits of Philosophy, Shame and Necessity, and Truth and Truthfulness.

Died: June 6, 1961, Küsnacht, Switzerland

Carl Jung was a psychiatrist who founded analytical psychology. Jung's work was influential in the fields of psychiatry, anthropology, archaeology, literature, philosophy, and religious studies.

Died: June 4, 1971, Budapest, Hungary

György Lukács was a Hungarian Marxist philosopher and one of the founders of Western Marxism, an interpretive tradition that departed from the Marxist ideological orthodoxy of the Soviet Union.

Assassinated: January 30, 1948, New Delhi, India

Mahatma Gandhi was an Indian activist who was the leader of the Indian independence movement against British colonial rule.

Died: July 4, 1934, Sancellemoz

Marie Curie was a Polish and naturalized French physicist and chemist who conducted pioneering research on radioactivity. She was the first woman to win a Nobel Prize.

Died: October 18, 1931, West Orange, New Jersey, United States

Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor.

United States

William Maher is an American comedian, political commentator, and television host. He is well known for the HBO political talk show Real Time with Bill Maher and the similar late-night show called ...

Died: April 19, 1882, Home of Charles Darwin - Down House, Downe, United Kingdom

Charles Darwin's proposition that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors is now widely accepted and considered a foundational concept in science.

Died: April 18, 1955, Princeton, New Jersey, United States

Einstein developed the theory of relativity, one of the two pillars of modern physics. Einstein's work is also known for its influence on the philosophy of science.

Died: May 22, 1885, Paris, France

Victor Marie Hugo was a French poet, novelist, and dramatist of the Romantic movement. Hugo is considered to be one of the greatest and best-known French writers.

Died: May 30, 1778, Paris, France

François-Marie Arouet, known by his nom de plume Voltaire, was a French Enlightenment writer, historian, and philosopher famous for his wit, his attacks on the established Catholic Church, and his...

January 21, 1950, London, United Kingdom

Eric Arthur Blair, better known by his pen name George Orwell, was an English novelist, essayist, journalist, and critic.

Died: May 8, 1873, Avignon, France

John Stuart Mill was an English philosopher, political economist and civil servant. One of the most influential thinkers in the history of liberalism, he contributed widely to social theory...

Died: June 9, 1870, Higham, United Kingdom

Charles Dickens was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world's best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era.

Died: May 8, 1880, Canteleu, France

Gustave Flaubert was a French novelist. Highly influential, he has been considered the leading exponent of literary realism in his country.

Died: November 14, 1831, Berlin, Germany

Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel was a German philosopher and an important figure of German idealism. He achieved wide renown in his day and, while primarily influential within the continental tradition

Died: January 25, 1640, Oxford, United Kingdom

From Oxford University, Robert Burton was best known for the classic The Anatomy of Melancholy. He was also the incumbent of St Thomas the Martyr, Oxford, and of Seagrave in Leicestershire.

Died: June 6, 1832, Westminster, United Kingdom

Bentham defined as the "fundamental axiom" of his philosophy the principle that "it is the greatest happiness of the greatest number that is the measure of right and wrong".

Died: September 13, 1592

Michel Eyquem de Montaigne, Lord of Montaigne was one of the most significant philosophers of the French Renaissance, known for popularizing the essay as a literary genre.

Died: June 8, 1889, Dublin, Republic of Ireland

Gerard Manley Hopkins SJ was an English poet and Jesuit priest, whose posthumous fame established him among the leading Victorian poets. Two of his major themes were nature and religion.

Cory Elliot is a Fictional Character in Daniel Sanderson's book Will Freeman, a Literary Fiction designed to act a companion piece to his book on the philosophy of the p.(x) = Big Data Determinism.

Died: November 11, 1855, Copenhagen, Denmark

Søren Aabye Kierkegaard was a Danish philosopher, theologian, poet, social critic and religious author who is widely considered to be the first existentialist philosopher.

Died: April 30, 1945, Berlin, Germany

Adolf Hitler was a German politician who was the leader of the Nazi Party, Chancellor of Germany from 1933 to 1945 and Führer of Nazi Germany from 1934 to 1945.

United States

Avram Noam Chomsky is an American linguist, philosopher, cognitive scientist, historian, social critic, and political activist.

Died: October 7, 1849, Baltimore, Maryland, United States

Edgar Allan Poe was an American writer, editor, and literary critic. Poe is best known for his poetry and short stories, particularly his tales of mystery and the macabre.

Died: August 26, 1910, Chocorua, New Hampshire, United States

William James was an American philosopher and psychologist who was also trained as a physician. The first educator to offer a psychology course in the United States, James was one of the leading...

Died: March 5, 1827, Paris, France

Pierre-Simon Laplace was a French scholar whose work was important to the development of mathematics, statistics, physics and astronomy..

Died: March 4, 1852, Moscow, Russia

Nikolai Vasilievich Gogol was a Russian dramatist of Ukrainian origin. Although Gogol was considered by his contemporaries to be one of the preeminent figures of the natural school of Russian literary

Died: April 14, 1964, Silver Spring, Maryland, United States

Rachel Louise Carson was an American marine biologist, author, and conservationist whose book Silent Spring and other writings are credited with advancing the global environmental movement.

Died: August 18, 1990, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States

Burrhus Frederic Skinner, was an American psychologist, behaviorist, author, inventor, and social philosopher. He retired as a Professor of Psychology at Harvard University in 1974.

Calgary, Alberta

I am an aerospace engineer from way back who now specializes in perpetual EPICNess! I love sci-fi and love to imagine a universe where we have come together to explore the cosmos within and without.

Died: February 2, 1970, Penrhyndeudraeth, United Kingdom

Bertrand Arthur William Russell, 3rd Earl Russell, OM, FRS was a British philosopher, logician, mathematician, historian, writer, social critic, political activist and Nobel laureate.

Died: February 23, 1855, Göttingen, Germany

Carl Friedrich Gauss was a German mathematician who made significant contributions to many fields, including number theory, algebra, statistics, analysis, differential geometry, geodesy, ...

Died: February 11, 1650, Stockholm, Sweden

René Descartes was a French philosopher, mathematician, and scientist.

Died: October 4, 1947, Göttingen, Germany

Max Karl Ernst Ludwig Planck, ForMemRS was a German theoretical physicist whose discovery of energy quanta won him the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1918.

Died: February 9, 1881, Saint Petersburg, Russia

Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoyevsky, sometimes transliterated Dostoevsky, was a Russian novelist, short story writer, essayist, journalist and philosopher.

Lycomedes of the island of Skyros threw Theseus off a cliff after he had lost popularity in Athens.

Ryan is a thinker! His thought leadership is anchored in philosophy and the exploration of the mind. His academic background and expositions challenge the way we think.

Died: February 28, 1916, Chelsea, London, United Kingdom

Henry James is regarded as a key transitional figure between literary realism and literary modernism and is considered by many to be among the greatest novelists in the English language.

Died: February 14, 1943, Göttingen, Germany

David Hilbert was a German mathematician. He is recognized as one of the most influential and universal mathematicians of the 19th and early 20th centuries.

Died: July 4, 1848, Paris, France

François-René, vicomte de Chateaubriand, was a French writer, politician, diplomat and historian who founded Romanticism in French literature.

Died: August 20, 2001, Bournemouth, United Kingdom

Fred Hoyle an astronomer who rejected the "Big Bang" theory, a term coined by him on BBC radio, and his promotion of panspermia as the origin of life on Earth.

Y

Paris, France

Paul Celan was a Romanian-born German language poet and translator. He became one of the major German-language poets of the post-World War II era.

Died: March 15, 44 BC, Rome, Italy

Julius Caesar, was a Roman politician and general who played a critical role in the events that led to the demise of the Roman Republic and the rise of the Roman Empire.

Died: March 6, 1866, Cambridge, United Kingdom

William Whewell FRS FGS was an English polymath, scientist, Anglican priest, philosopher, theologian, and historian of science. He was Master of Trinity College, Cambridge.

Died: October 20, 1984, Tallahassee, Florida, United States

Paul Dirac was a theoretical physicist who is regarded as one of the most significant physicists of the 20th century. I often refer to the Dirac Function in the QFT Horizon Principle.

Langley, BC, Canada

Died: April 23, 1616, Stratford-upon-Avon, United Kingdom

William Shakespeare was an English poet, playwright, and actor, widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and the world's pre-eminent dramatist.

Died: June 28, 1836, Montpelier, Montpelier Station, Virginia, Virginia, United States

James Madison Jr. was an American statesman and Founding Father who served as the fourth President of the United States from 1809 to 1817.

Died: April 17, 1790, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States

Benjamin Franklin was one of the Founding Fathers of the United States. Franklin was a renowned polymath and a leading author, printer, political theorist, politician, freemason, postmaster, ...

Died: 323 BC, Corinth, Greece

Diogenes was a Greek philosopher and one of the founders of Cynic philosophy. Also known as Diogenes the Cynic, he was born in Sinope, an Ionian colony on the Black Sea, in 412 or 404 B.C.

Died: August 31, 1920, Großbothen, Grimma, Germany

Wilhelm Maximilian Wundt was a German physician, physiologist, philosopher, and professor, known today as one of the founding figures of modern psychology.

Died: February 17, 1600, Campo de' Fiori, Rome, Italy

Giordano Bruno was an Italian Dominican friar, philosopher, mathematician, poet, and cosmological theorist. His cosmological theories, which conceptually extended the then-novel Copernican model.

Montreal, Canada

"The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails." — William Arthur Ward

Toronto

Olivia Spahn-Vieira is a Toronto-based writer, musician, and storyteller.

SK

Victoria, BC, Canada

Alice Ann Munro is a Canadian short story writer who won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 2013.

I am a philosopher & writer constantly playing with new ideas, concepts, and frameworks of reality. My primary academic interests include phenomenology & existentialism.

Black Diamond, Alberta

Co-founder of ENTA Solutions Inc by day, artist, children's author, mom and wife by night. A micro-influencer and leader with the title of Idea's Gardener bringing EPIC everyday.

Sometime in the future

Will Freeman is the embodiment of man's future as told in Will Free Man.

Z

Oxford, UK

Hannah completed her PhD in GeoSciences at the University of Edinburgh.

Died: February 3, 2020, Cambridge, United Kingdom

Francis George Steiner, was a literary critic, essayist, philosopher, novelist, and educator. He wrote extensively about the relationship between language, literature and society.

Vancouver, Canada

William Higginson is a Canadian surrealist painter. Higginson hopes to make his viewer think with introspection, evoke emotions, and ask questions enabling you to look deep within.

Died: 1430, Poissy, France

Christine de Pizan was an Italian French late medieval author. Her most famous literary works are The Book of the City of Ladies and The Treasure of the City of Ladies.

Woodlawn Cemetery, Elmira, New York, United States

Samuel Langhorne Clemens, better known by his pen name Mark Twain, was an American writer, humorist, entrepreneur, publisher, and lecturer.

Died: May 15, 1886, Amherst, Massachusetts, United States

Emily Elizabeth Dickinson was an American poet. Dickinson was born in Amherst, Massachusetts into a prominent family with strong ties to its community.

Died: April 23, 1850, Cumberland, United Kingdom

William Wordsworth was a major English Romantic poet who, with Samuel Taylor Coleridge, helped to launch the Romantic Age in English literature with their joint publication Lyrical Ballads.

Died: April 15, 1980, Paris, France

Jean-Paul Charles Aymard Sartre was a French philosopher, playwright, novelist, political activist, biographer, and literary critic.

Died: December 15, 2011, Houston, Texas, United States

Christopher Eric Hitchens was an Anglo-American author, columnist, essayist, orator, religious and literary critic, social critic, and journalist.

Died: July 2, 1778, Ermenonville, France

Jean-Jacques Rousseau was a Francophone Genevan philosopher, writer, and composer of the 18th century.

Died: June 20, 1995, Paris, France

Emil Cioran was a Romanian philosopher and essayist, who published works in both Romanian and French. He frequently engages with issues of suffering, decay, and nihilism.

Died: February 15, 1988, Los Angeles, California, United States

Richard Feynman was an American theoretical physicist known for his work in the path integral formulation of quantum mechanics, the theory of quantum electrodynamics, and the physics of the ...

Died: January 4, 1960, Villeblevin, France

Albert Camus was a French philosopher, author, and journalist. His views contributed to the rise of the philosophy known as absurdism.

Died: February 12, 1804, Königsberg, Germany

Immanuel Kant was a German philosopher who is a central figure in modern philosophy. Kant argued that the human mind creates the structure of human experience, that reason is the source of morality,

Chalcis, Greece

Aristotle was an ancient Greek philosopher and scientist born in the city of Stagira, Chalkidice, on the northern periphery of Classical Greece

Died: December 20, 1996, Seattle, Washington, United States

Carl Edward Sagan was an American astronomer, cosmologist, astrophysicist, astrobiologist, author, science popularizer, and science communicator in astronomy and other natural sciences.

Died: August 17, 1786, Potsdam, Germany

Frederick II was King of Prussia from 1740 until 1786, the longest reign of any Hohenzollern king. His most significant accomplishments during his reign included his military victories, his...

Died: August 5, 2019, Montefiore Medical Center Moses Division, New York, United States

Died: October 21, 1969, St. Petersburg, Florida, United States

Jack Kerouac was an American novelist and poet. He is considered a literary iconoclast and, alongside William S. Burroughs and Allen Ginsberg, a pioneer of the Beat Generation.

Died: March 26, 1892, Camden, New Jersey, United States

Walter "Walt" Whitman was an American poet, essayist, and journalist. A humanist, he was a part of the transition between transcendentalism and realism, incorporating both views in his works.

Hartford, Connecticut, United States

Wallace Stevens was an American modernist poet. He was born in Reading, Pennsylvania, educated at Harvard and then New York Law School, and he spent most of his life in the insurance industry.

Died: September 23, 1939, Hampstead, United Kingdom

Sigmund Freud was an Austrian neurologist and the founder of psychoanalysis, a clinical method for treating psychopathology through dialogue between a patient and a psychoanalyst.

Died: May 26, 1976, Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany

Martin Heidegger was a German philosopher and a seminal thinker in the Continental tradition and philosophical hermeneutics.

Died: February 18, 1546, Eisleben, Germany

Martin Luther was a German professor of theology, composer, priest, and monk, and a seminal figure in the Protestant Reformation. Luther came to reject several teachings of the Roman Catholic Church.

Died: Constanța, Romania

Ovid Roman poet who lived during the reign of Augustus. He was a contemporary of the older Virgil and Horace, with whom he is often ranked as one of the three canonical poets of Latin literature.

Died: April 19, 1824, Missolonghi, Greece

Lord Byron, was a British nobleman, poet, peer, politician, and leading figure in the Romantic movement. He is regarded as one of the greatest British poets and remains widely read and influential.

Died: April 9, 1626, Highgate, London, United Kingdom

Francis Bacon was an English philosopher, statesman, scientist, and more. After his death, his works remained influential in the development of the scientific method during the scientific revolution.

Died: July 1, 1896, Hartford, Connecticut, United States

Harriet Beecher Stowe came from the Beecher family, a famous religious family, and is best known for her novel Uncle Tom's Cabin, which depicts the harsh conditions for enslaved African Americans.

Died: July 2, 2016, Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States

Eliezer Wiesel was a writer, professor, political activist, Nobel Laureate, and Holocaust survivor. Night, a work based on his experiences as a prisoner in the Nazi concentration camps.

Died: December 6, 1882, London, United Kingdom

Anthony Trollope was an English novelist of the Victorian era. He wrote novels on political, social, and gender issues, and other topical matters.

Died: October 5, 2011, Palo Alto, California, United States

Steven Paul Jobs was an American business magnate and investor. He was the chairman, chief executive officer, and co-founder of Apple Inc., the chairman and majority shareholder of Pixar.

Portbou, Spain

Walter Bendix Schönflies Benjamin was a German Jewish philosopher, cultural critic and essayist. An eclectic thinker, combining elements of German idealism, Romanticism, Western Marxism, and Jewish..

Died: August 3, 1964, Milledgeville, Georgia, United States

Mary Flannery O'Connor was an American writer and essayist. She wrote two novels and thirty-two short stories, as well as a number of reviews and commentaries.

Died: January 24, 1965, Kensington, London, United Kingdom

Winston Churchill was a British politician, army officer, and writer, who was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. As Prime Minister, Churchill led Britain to victory in the Second World War.

Died: December 21, 1940, Hollywood, Los Angeles, California, United States

Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald, known professionally as F. Scott Fitzgerald, was an American novelist and short story writer, whose works illustrate the Jazz Age.

Died: March 28, 1941, Lewes, United Kingdom

Adeline Virginia Woolf was an English writer who is considered one of the foremost modernists of the twentieth century and a pioneer in the use of stream of consciousness as a narrative device.

Died: March 14, 2018, Cambridge, United Kingdom

Stephen Hawking was an English theoretical physicist, cosmologist, and author, who was director of research at the Centre for Theoretical Cosmology at the University of Cambridge at time of his death.

Died: December 22, 1880, Chelsea, London, United Kingdom

Mary Anne Evans, known by her pen name George Eliot, was an English novelist, poet, journalist, translator and one of the leading writers of the Victorian era.

Died: April 29, 1951, Cambridge, United Kingdom

Ludwig Josef Johann Wittgenstein was an Austrian-British philosopher who worked primarily in logic, the philosophy of mathematics, the philosophy of mind, and the philosophy of language.

Died: November 23, 1976, Créteil, France

André Malraux was a French novelist, art theorist and Minister of Cultural Affairs. Malraux's novel La Condition Humaine won the Prix Goncourt.

New York, United States

Dylan Marlais Thomas was a Welsh poet and writer whose works include the poems "Do not go gentle into that good night" and "And death shall have no dominion"; the 'play for voices' Under Milk Wood...

Died: January 18, 1936, Middlesex Hospital, London

Rudyard Kipling was an English journalist, short-story writer, poet, and novelist. Kipling's works of fiction include The Jungle Book, Kim, and short stories, including "The Man Who Would Be King".

Died: February 1, 1851, Chester Square, London, United Kingdom

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley was an English novelist, short story writer, dramatist, essayist, biographer, and travel writer, best known for her Gothic novel Frankenstein: or, The Modern Prometheus.

Died: August 19, 1662, Paris, France

Blaise Pascal was a French mathematician, physicist, inventor, writer and Catholic theologian. He was a child prodigy who was educated by his father, a tax collector in Rouen.

Died: 270 BC, Athens, Greece

Epicurus was an ancient Greek philosopher who founded a highly influential school of philosophy now called Epicureanism. He was born on the Greek island of Samos to Athenian parents.

Died: September 9, 1976, Beijing, China

Mao Zedong was a Chinese communist revolutionary and founding father of the People's Republic of China. As the Chairman of the Communist Party of China from 1949 until his death in 1976.

Clinton Eastwood is an American actor, filmmaker, musician, and political figure. After achieving success in the Western TV series Rawhide, he rose to international fame with his role as the Man ...

Died: May 2, 1519, Château du Clos Lucé, Amboise, France

Leonardo da Vinci was an Italian polymath of the Renaissance whose areas of interest included invention, drawing, painting, sculpture, architecture, science, music, mathematics, engineering, and more.

Died: November 18, 1962, Carlsberg, Copenhagen, Denmark

Niels Henrik David Bohr was a Danish physicist who made foundational contributions to understanding atomic structure and quantum theory, for which he received the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1922.

Died: January 20, 1900, Brantwood, United Kingdom

John Ruskin was the leading English art critic of the Victorian era, as well as an art patron, draughtsman, watercolourist, a prominent social thinker and philanthropist.

Died: November 30, 1900, French Third Republic

Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde was an Irish poet and playwright. After writing in different forms throughout the 1880s, he became one of London's most popular playwrights in the early 1890s.

Died: May 6, 1862, Concord, Massachusetts, United States

Henry David Thoreau was an American essayist, poet, and philosopher. As a leading transcendentalist, he is best known for his book Walden, and his essay "Civil Disobedience".

United States

E. O. Wilson, is an American biologist, researcher, theorist, naturalist and author. His biological specialty is myrmecology, the study of ants, on which he is the world's leading expert.

Died: December 20, 1968, New York City, New York, United States

John Steinbeck was an American author. He won the 1962 Nobel Prize in Literature "for his realistic and imaginative writings, combining as they do sympathetic humour and keen social perception".

Died: January 2, 2017, Antony, France

John Peter Berger was an English art critic, novelist, painter and poet. His novel G. won the 1972 Booker Prize, and his essay on art criticism, Ways of Seeing, written as an accompaniment to a BBC...

Died: July 6, 1962, Byhalia, Mississippi, United States

William Cuthbert Faulkner was an American writer and Nobel Prize laureate from Oxford, Mississippi. Faulkner wrote novels, short stories, a play, poetry, essays, and screenplays.

Died: March 31, 1727, Kensington, London, United Kingdom

Sir Isaac Newton was an English mathematician, astronomer, and physicist who is widely recognized as one of the most influential scientists of all time and a key figure in the scientific revolution.

Died: September 1321, Ravenna, Italy

Dante was a major Italian poet of the Late Middle Ages. His Divine Comedy, originally called Comedìa and later christened Divina by Boccaccio, is widely considered the greatest literary work composed

Died: October 6, 1892, Lurgashall, United Kingdom

Alfred Tennyson, 1st Baron Tennyson, FRS was Poet Laureate of Great Britain and Ireland during much of Queen Victoria's reign and remains one of the most popular British poets.

Died: Metapontum

Pythagoras of Samos was an Ionian Greek philosopher and the eponymous founder of the Pythagoreanism movement.

Died: May 30, 1744, Pope's villa

Alexander Pope is best known for his satirical verse, including Essay on Criticism, The Rape of the Lock and The Dunciad, and for his translation of Homer.

Died: Ephesus, Selçuk, Turkey

Heraclitus of Ephesus was a pre-Socratic Greek philosopher, and a native of the city of Ephesus, then part of the Persian Empire. Little is known about his early life and education.

Died: October 17, 1586, Arnhem, Netherlands

Sir Philip Sidney was an English poet, courtier, scholar, and soldier, who is remembered as one of the most prominent figures of the Elizabethan age.

Died: 127 AD, Delphi, Greece

Plutarch was a Greek biographer and essayist, known primarily for his Parallel Lives and Moralia. Plutarch's surviving works were written in Greek, but intended for both Greek and Roman readers.

ied: November 1, 1972, Venice, Italy

Ezra Pound was an expatriate American poet and critic, and a major figure in the early modernist poetry movement. His contribution to poetry began with his development of Imagism.

Died: August 5, 1962, Brentwood, Los Angeles, California, United States

Marilyn Monroe was an American actress, model, and singer. Famous for playing comic "blonde bombshell" characters, she became one of the most popular sex symbols of the 1950s and early 1960s.

Died: March 22, 1832, Weimar, Germany

Goethe works include epic and lyric poetry; prose and verse dramas; memoirs; an autobiography; literary and aesthetic criticism; treatises on botany, anatomy, and color; and four novels.

Died: September 21, 1860, Frankfurt, Germany

Arthur Schopenhauer was a German philosopher. He is best known for his 1818 work The World as Will and Representation, wherein he characterizes the phenomenal world as the product of a blind and ...

Died: October 20, 1894, Salcombe, United Kingdom

James Anthony Froude was an English historian, novelist, biographer, and editor of Fraser's Magazine.

Córdoba, Spain

Luis de Góngora y Argote was a Spanish Baroque lyric poet. Góngora and his lifelong rival, Francisco de Quevedo, are widely considered the most prominent Spanish poets of all time. His style...

Died: June 7, 1970, Coventry, United Kingdom

Edward Morgan Forster was an English novelist, short story writer, essayist and librettist. Many of his novels examined class difference and hypocrisy in early 20th-century British society, notably...

Died: February 19, 1837, Zürich, Switzerland

Georg Büchner was a dramatist and writer of poetry and prose, considered part of the Young Germany movement. He was also a revolutionary, and the brother of physician and philosopher Ludwig Büchner.

Died: September 5, 1914, Villeroy, France

Charles Péguy's two main philosophies were socialism and nationalism, but by 1908 at the latest, after years of uneasy agnosticism, he had become a believing but non-practicing Roman Catholic.

Died: January 8, 1642, Arcetri

Galileo Galilei was an Italian astronomer, physicist and engineer, sometimes described as a polymath.

Chalfont St Giles, United Kingdom

John Milton was an English poet, polemicist, man of letters, and civil servant for the Commonwealth of England under Oliver Cromwell.

Died: 580 BC, Lesbos, Greece

Sappho was an archaic Greek poet from the island of Lesbos. Sappho is known for her lyric poetry, written to be sung and accompanied by a lyre.

Died: June 8, 1970, Menlo Park, California, United States

Abraham Maslow was a psychologist who was best known for creating Maslow's hierarchy of needs, a theory of psychological health predicated on fulfilling innate human needs in priority.

Died: January 7, 1943, The New Yorker, A Wyndham Hotel, New York, New York, United States

Nikola Tesla was a Serbian-American inventor, electrical engineer, mechanical engineer, and futurist who is best known for his contributions to the design of modern alternating current electricity.

X

Died: November 18, 1922, Paris, France

Marcel Proust was a French novelist, critic, and essayist best known for his monumental novel À la recherche du temps perdu, published in seven parts between 1913 and 1927.

Died: June 6, 2016, County Cork, Ireland

Sir Peter Levin Shaffer, CBE, was an English playwright and screenwriter. He wrote numerous award-winning plays, of which several were adapted into films.

W

Died: November 9, 1997, Princeton, New Jersey, United States

Carl Gustav "Peter" Hempel was a German writer and philosopher. He was a major figure in logical empiricism, a 20th-century movement in the philosophy of science.

Died: October 9, 2004, Paris, France

Jacques Derrida was an Algerian-born French philosopher best known for developing a form of semiotic analysis known as deconstruction.

Died: April 9, 1882, Birchington-on-Sea, United Kingdom

Dante Gabriel Rossetti was a British poet, illustrator, painter and translator, and a member of the Rossetti family. He founded the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood in 1848.

Ontario, Canada

Brian earned a PhD in philosophy at the University of Guelph, Ontario. His areas of research interest are phenomenology, existentialism and the philosophy of religion.

Bronx, NY

For the past 25 years, I have been working with high school students in the rough neighborhood. I found out the hard way how to prepare students not just for their studies in English class ...

Died: August 14, 1841, Göttingen, Germany

Johann Friedrich Herbart was a German philosopher, psychologist and founder of pedagogy as an academic discipline.

Died: July 29, 1979, Starnberg, Germany

Herbert Marcuse was a German-American philosopher, sociologist, and political theorist, associated with the Frankfurt School of Critical Theory.

Died: April 21, 2015, Ithaca, New York, United States

Meyer Howard "Mike" Abrams, usually cited as M. H. Abrams, was an American literary critic, known for works on romanticism, in particular his book The Mirror and the Lamp.

Somewhere in North America

Boethius is a tenured associate professor of philosophy at a public university somewhere in North America.

Australia

Steve Keen is an Australian economist and author. He considers himself a post-Keynesian, criticising neoclassical economics as inconsistent, unscientific and empirically unsupported.

The Bronx, New York City, New York, United States

Linda Pastan is an American poet of Jewish background. From 1991–1995 she was Poet Laureate of Maryland.

United States

George Walker Bush is an American politician who served as the 43rd President of the United States from 2001 to 2009. He was also the 46th Governor of Texas from 1995 to 2000

Crowborough, United Kingdom

Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle, was a British writer best known for his detective fiction featuring the character Sherlock Holmes.

Died: February 19, 1951, Paris, France

André Paul Guillaume Gide was a French author and winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1947 "for his comprehensive and artistically significant writings, in which human problems and conditions.

Died: September 2, 2015

Henry Gleitman was a Professor Emeritus of Psychology at the University of Pennsylvania. Gleitman was born in Leipzig, Germany, receiving his Ph.D. in psychology from Berkeley.

Ancient Greece

Homer is the name ascribed by the ancient Greeks to the legendary author of the Iliad and the Odyssey, two epic poems which are the central works of ancient Greek literature.

Died: April 8, 1908, Flatbush, New York City, New York, United States

Langdon Smith was a journalist and author. His most well-known work is the poem "Evolution", which begins with the line "When you were a tadpole and I was a fish".

My name is Aimee and I love DIY. In fact I love DIY so much that I want to be your resource for DIY projects and tutorials. Think of me as your perfect little DIY goddess, or darlin’ if you must.

L_E

Somewhere in the Southern Hemisphere.

L_E is a Ph.D. student in philosophy at a public university somewhere in the Southern Hemisphere.

India